Waking Up Dead

Waking Up Dead

Every night, I would wish that the next morning I would wake up dead.

Of course this is technically impossible. It was however a reflection of the deep emotional pain, anguish and hopelessness that I felt for so many years. Waking up dead did not mean waking up with the sudden ability to turn off my emotions, be numb to hurt or still be in this world physically. It literally meant that I wanted to die.

That desire turned many times into actions – attempts to end my life. That desire resulted in multiple psychiatric hospitalizations. Most of all that desire resulted in me not being able to be myself, to be free, to be happy and to be whoever it was that I wanted to be.

No one knew.

This isn’t something you casually share with your friends. It isn’t something that is easily shared with your family – no matter how close the family is. The fear of shame, being judged, rejection and social isolation is one thing. Being called or considered “crazy” or “psycho” is a whole other thing! As a person of color, an ‘army brat’, a ‘creative’ – let’s just say I was already enough of an outsider, the butt of many sneers, stares and jokes that I seriously did not want one more thing folks could put in their attack-Keris-arsenal. So I remained silent.

No one knew.  I suffered alone, in silence. Every night wishing; praying that I would wake up dead.

But I didn’t. I didn’t wake up dead. I can now look back and say – that’s a good thing!

On World Suicide Prevention Day I want to thank my mother. When she found out that I had attempted to end my life and was in the hospital, she got on the first flight she could. She came directly from the airport to the psychiatric hospital. When the buzz of the hospital gate sounded announcing a visitor, I for the first time left my room. I ran, ran to see my mom, to feel her hug and to know –really know that my mother, my family loved me no matter what. We hugged and I held on tight wanting that hug to adsorb the pain and replace it with love. I cried and my mom held me tight right back as she stoked my hair whispering, cooing “it will be ok”. That day she started a new ritual with me.

She told me about the day I was born. She told me how she wished and prayed that she would have a little girl. That my brother would have a little sister to play with and that she could name me Keris after her very best friend. Those were her prayers for nine months. She told me how when I came out – her prayers were answered and that there I was this beautiful little girl, head full of jet black hair in a perfect bob hairstyle and large shiny black eyes. There I was – given to her and this world for a purpose. Her hopes, dreams and prayers for this little girl had been realized because there I was. There I was with something that I was here in this world to do. I was here for a reason. She would be with me, stay with me and support me no matter what to find my purpose here on earth.

Thanks mom! Thank you for telling me my birth story every time I thought I could not make it another day on this earth. Thanks mom for believing in me and for wishing, dreaming and praying my existence here on earth. It hasn’t been easy, especially after your passing. When it gets hard, when I wish as can happen on occasion, that I could wake up dead – I hear your voice telling me about the day I was born. And I stay.

For those still in the darkness – please stay. Like me and many others you are here for a purpose. Whatever that purpose is – we need you in this world and there are people who will walk with you in you journey from darkness to light.

On World Suicide Prevention Day, my hope and my prayer is that we first talk about suicide and suicide prevention everyday. That we create spaces and language that help those who are struggling in silence find their voice, find that person with whom they can express their pain so they too can live a life of their dreams.

When you are lost in the darkness, feeling hopeless and it is impossible to go on – We will hold the hope for you.

There is always someone who will listen.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Crisis Text Line: text START to 741741
Available 24 hours

By | 2017-02-10T09:33:26+00:00 September 26th, 2016|Stories, Surviving Suicide|0 Comments

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